Need a good friends to lovers book? Check out this review by Books Best Blog – Sav

What Do You Want? by K. Dosal McLendon My rating: 5 of 5 stars. Friends to Lovers with all the feels! I liked the overall theme of this book. The …

What Do You Want (What Do You, #3). ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Welcome to uncanny hell. The new Chucky movie is just that, a travel to the darkest and most disturbing cranny in the uncanny valley.

After moving to a new city, young Andy Barclay receives a special present from his mother — a seemingly innocent Buddi doll that becomes his best friend. When the doll suddenly takes on a life of its own, Andy unites with other neighborhood children to stop the sinister toy from wreaking bloody havoc.

(Description from Google results)

With Mark Hamill casted for the role of Chucky I had high hopes for the reboot of this sinister doll.

Mark Hamill is an all around fantastic actor, but he’s a standout voice actor. I will say that he is the best part of this movie. Hamill can be such a creep and it worked well for the murderous doll.

I hated Chucky as a child, the scary little dude gave me nightmares and I couldn’t stand him. I didn’t even want to watch this movie, my boyfriend did, but I have to talk about how strange the experience was.

The CGI used in this movie creates a trip into the uncanny valley that I’ll never forget. Chucky is scary, but not because what he does is scary. He’s scary because his facial expressions look like lumped up play doh that keeps blobbing across a head shaped sphere. It wasn’t the type of scary I imagine they were going for, it’s more of a strange body horror than a good hack and slash film. It was so strange I’m having a hard time explaining just what he looked like. I’ll try and find a gif.

What is that gross lumpiness they added to his face. How did we end up with the monstrosity above when we started with this scary dude?

Honestly this image gave me horrible nightmares as a child and I got creeped out saving it for this post. Gonna go delete it now.

I guess my main point is that the new Chucky is scary in all the wrong ways. He feels less like a doll and more like a CGI disaster.

I will say that modernizing Chucky’s interface into a doll ran by an app was a unique and welcome choice. They ingrain Chucky into social media and make him an almost omniscient monster. I loved that because it was relatable in the age of Siri and Alexa. A+ for the modern idea integration.

This movie also leaned way too hard on the campy nature of the old Chucky movies. They tried to emulate old school horror movies too much, and instead of capturing what made them scary, captured how ridiculous some of the horror movie tropes are. The over the top deaths could have been way less cheesy and the gore was like that scene in Friday the 13th with the blood geyser, it was just outlandish.

Rating: 2 out of 5.

I give Child’s Play 2/5 stars. It was just too campy and it missed the mark on key horror movie elements.

If you’d like to watch this hard to look at, gorey, nightmare for yourself follow this link to rent, and I’ll get a portion of the profit at no extra cost to you.

So for some reason I decided that this month was going to be the month of Percy Jackson/Rick Riordan, and I ordered several complete box sets of Riordan series’. Here’s the Riordan haul 📚

Percy Jackson and The Olympians

Percy Jackson is a good kid, but he can’t seem to focus on his schoolwork or control his temper. And lately, being away at boarding school is only getting worse-Percy could have sworn his pre-algebra teacher turned into a monster and tried to kill him.

(Description from Amazon)

You’ve probably either heard of or read this series. I have, but I want to reread them and I don’t seem to have the complete set I had in middle school anymore 😅 So I ordered a new set.

The Heroes Of Olympus

Jason has a problem. He doesn’t remember anything before waking up on a school bus holding hands with a girl. Apparently she’s his girlfriend Piper, his best friend is a kid named Leo, and they’re all students in the Wilderness School, a boarding school for “bad kids.” What he did to end up here, Jason has no idea—except that everything seems very wrong.

(Description of first book from Amazon)

I started this series when it first released and I just didn’t get into it as a kid, so I’m hoping that I’ll love it the second time around. I’ve heard nothing but great things so I have very high hopes.

The Kane Chronicles

Since their mother’s death, Carter and Sadie have become near strangers. While Sadie has lived with her grandparents in London, her brother has traveled the world with their father, the brilliant Egyptologist, Dr. Julius Kane. One night, Dr. Kane brings the siblings together for a “research experiment” at the British Museum, where he hopes to set things right for his family. Instead, he unleashes the Egyptian god Set, who banishes him to oblivion and forces the children to flee for their lives.

(Description of first book from Amazon)

Just like Heroes Of Olympus I gave this a try when it first came out and I just didn’t click with Egyptian mythology like I did with Greek. So I’m giving it another go.

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard

Magnus Chase has always been a troubled kid. Since his mother’s mysterious death, he’s lived alone on the streets of Boston, surviving by his wits, keeping one step ahead of the police and the truant officers.

One day, he’s tracked down by an uncle he barely knows—a man his mother claimed was dangerous. Uncle Randolph tells him an impossible secret: Magnus is the son of a Norse god.

The Viking myths are true. The gods of Asgard are preparing for war. Trolls, giants and worse monsters are stirring for doomsday. To prevent Ragnarok, Magnus must search the Nine Worlds for a weapon that has been lost for thousands of years.

When an attack by fire giants forces him to choose between his own safety and the lives of hundreds of innocents, Magnus makes a fatal decision.

Sometimes, the only way to start a new life is to die . . .

(Description of first book from Amazon)

I’m probably most excited to read this series. I’ve never tried it, but Norse Mythology fascinates me. Fingers crossed that it’s as awesome as I’ve been told.


Yep, so I’ve declared July the unofficial Rick Riordan month. I’m so excited to read these! Have you read any of them? Let me know in the comments!

I didn’t post as many reviews as I would’ve liked, but there were some awesome books this month.

Eagle Of The Empire by Martin Ferguson

When his brother mysteriously disappears, sixteen-year-old Adam Hunter discovers that the myths and legends he was told as a boy have more truth to them than he ever thought possible.

To free his brother, Adam must uncover the truth about the lost Roman Ninth Legion and find its fabled Eagle Standard, an artefact of mysterious mythical power. Adam calls on the help of the British Museum, a team of quirky Relic Hunters, skilled in recovering and protecting relics around the world. 

They need to act fast for they are not the only ones searching for the relic.

To save the life of his brother, Adam and his allies will face an immortal tyrant who seeks to claim the Eagle of the Empire for himself, and with it, bring the world to its knees.

(Description from Amazon)

We started off the month right with this book. It was a five star read and I can’t wait to read the next book in the series.

You can find the full review here.

The Book Of Moons by K.M. Herbert

Sixteen-year-old Kathy is on the run from a convent orphanage. She must reach Dublin to find her best friend but she’s woken up in an Irish Traveller camp, miles from anywhere. Her only chance of getting to the city is with their help, but for that, she needs to become one of them.

Kathy has until the next full moon to find a talent and prove herself worthy. She enlists the help of a gifted young fiddler named Heath. But the others have become suspicious of Kathy, made worse by the disaster that follows in her wake. Only the matriarch of the clan seems to believe in Kathy’s potential.

Time is running out for Kathy as she races across Ireland, along the way encountering fairy forts, changelings and tinkers. And while she tries their gifts of fortune telling and palmistry, nothing seems to work for her – until she discovers the Book of Moons.

(Description from Amazon)

Another fantastic read, Book Of Moons was just the type of historical fiction that I like. A little history, a little magic, and a little love.

Here’s the entire review.

The Bridge of Little Jeremy by Indrajit Garai

Jeremy’s mother is about to go to prison for their debt to the State. He is trying everything within his means to save her, but his options are running out fast. 

Then Jeremy discovers a treasure under Paris. 

This discovery may save his mother, but it doesn’t come for free. And he has to ride over several obstacles for his plan to work. 

Meanwhile, something else is limiting his time…

(Description from Amazon)

While I thought the characters were wonderful, they were placed in a book that didn’t match. To see what I mean check out my full review.

Wranglestone by Darren Charlton

Winter was the only season every Lake-Lander feared…

In a post-apocalyptic America, a community survives in a national park, surrounded by water that keeps the Dead at bay. But when winter comes, there’s nothing to stop them from crossing the ice.

Then homebody Peter puts the camp in danger by naively allowing a stranger to come ashore and he’s forced to leave the community of Wranglestone. Now he must help rancher Cooper, the boy he’s always watched from afar, herd the Dead from their shores before the lake freezes over.

But as love blossoms, a dark discovery reveals the sanctuary’s secret past. One that forces the pair to question everything they’ve ever known.

(Description from Goodreads)

I LOVED this book. It was sooooo good. Get an in depth look here.

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins

It is the morning of the reaping that will kick off the tenth annual Hunger Games. In the Capitol, eighteen-year-old Coriolanus Snow is preparing for his one shot at glory as a mentor in the Games. The once-mighty house of Snow has fallen on hard times, its fate hanging on the slender chance that Coriolanus will be able to outcharm, outwit, and outmaneuver his fellow students to mentor the winning tribute. 

The odds are against him. He’s been given the humiliating assignment of mentoring the female tribute from District 12, the lowest of the low.

Their fates are now completely intertwined — every choice Coriolanus makes could lead to favor or failure, triumph or ruin. Inside the arena, it will be a fight to the death. Outside the arena, Coriolanus starts to feel for his doomed tribute . . . and must weigh his need to follow the rules against his desire to survive no matter what it takes.

(Description from Amazon)

This was an excellent prequel that I’m so happy I finally got my hands on. I ordered the Hunger Games trilogy so that I can reread them. That’s how much I enjoyed this prequel. Follow this link for the full review.

The Long Night by Benjamin Percy

Following a string of mysterious deaths in Burns, Alaska, Special Agents Sally Pierce and Tad Marshall arrive to investigate. They soon find there’s more going on than meets the eye… Marvel’s hit scripted podcast, “Wolverine: The Dark Night,” comes to life on the page! Chilling twists and turns, brought to you by the original author of the podcast, Benjamin Percy, and the art talents of Marcio Takara!

(Description from Amazon)

I loved the podcast and now I love the graphic novel adaptation. Benjamin Percy really brought this story to life. Check out the review here.

When The Fires Broke Through: A Death At Dawn by Gabrielle Grey

A feudalistic world, embedded for centuries within the continent of Mystos is falling apart. Peasant uprisings, political and religious scheming from the academia, and the highborn’s lust for power are the causes for this political downfall in Mystos. A DEATH AT DAWN is the first book of an epic fantasy series that follows various characters, each going through their own journey during a time of civil turmoil. 

In the middle of the chaos is the ruling family of the Mountain Realm, House Wayward; a racially mixed family, dealing with their own inner conflicts.

However, when tragedy strikes House Wayward, instead of rallying together, the members split apart and strategize for their own advantage, even if that means taking each other down. 

This story gives the perspective of the people directly affected by these events. As some begin to experience adolescence, other older characters experience a taste of power, misery, deception, and insanity. Within the series, each character has to make decisions that not only affect their lives, but the lives around them, making many question if they are the true hero of this series. Book one sets up the journey that these characters will experience during the series.

(Description from Amazon)

This is a super long book that rode the line between 3 and 4 stars. I enjoyed it because it set up a massive world with history to back it. Find my review here.

My favorite?

My favorite book of the month would have to be Wranglestone. It was fun, surprising, and scary, all of my favorite things.

One of my favorite character in the Harry Potter series is Sirius Black, and fortunately he has many awesome quotes throughout the movies and books. Here are 3 of my favorites.

“We’ve all got both light and dark inside us. What matters is the part we choose to act on. That’s who we really are.”

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

This quote is definitely high on my list. It is so true, we’re all capable of good and evil but we must act on what’s right. It’s a reminder that even when I’m feeling down, it’s my choices that define me, and I’d say I try to make the good choice most of the time.

“The ones who love us never really leave us, you can always find them in here.”

— Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

I love this one because it gives me hope. I don’t know what happens after this, but it’s comforting to know that our loved ones are always with us. Whether it’s in spirit or in memory. It makes loss feel a lot less scary.

“If you want to know what a man’s like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”

— Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

This is such a good piece of advice, and it’s true. If you want to know the true nature of a person observe how they treat those who could be considered inferior. That is the fastest way to reveal whether a person is kind or cruel. I follow this advice all the time, and it’s never steered me wrong.


What are some of your favorite quotes? Let me know in the comments.

Prepare to be disappointed in the worst way, because SCOOB! is a huge letdown.

With hundreds of cases solved and adventures shared, Scooby and the gang face their biggest, most challenging mystery ever — a plot to unleash the ghost dog Cerberus upon the world. As they race to stop this global dog-pocalypse, the gang discovers that Scooby has a secret legacy and an epic destiny greater than anyone could have imagined.

(Description from IMDb)

I usually wouldn’t review something that I didn’t finish, but I must warn you about this movie. This is not the mystery solving gang we all love, it’s something new and nearly unrecognizable. If this is the ScoobyDoo for the next generation I don’t want to be involved.

We will start with the fact that before the movie was even made they didn’t even tell Mathew Lillard that he’d been replaced as Shaggy. This left a sour taste in my mouth from the beginning, and my only hope was that the replacement would be a good Shaggy. He wasn’t. He sounded atrocious, and like he was trying to do a really bad Shaggy impersonation. Scooby was the only character that sounded like himself, the rest of the gang sounded strange.

They also unnecessarily changed the origin story of how Shaggy met Scooby. To me it was weird and you’d expect them to throw in tidbits here and there for older fans, but honestly there was only one part that made me feel nostalgic.

They redid the old intro for Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! And I loved it, but that’s where the nostalgia and enjoyment stopped. The movie opens up with the gang wanting to take on higher profile cases and their representative is going to be Simon Cowell, but Simon Cowell doesn’t like Shaggy and Scooby and wants them gone. What kind of nonsensical beginning is that? Why Simon Cowell? It’s totally random and makes zero sense.

I was actually really excited to watch this when I heard that Mark Wahlberg was going to play Blue Falcon, but the movie was so terrible I didn’t even make it to the parts with Blue Falcon. I was so disappointed I couldn’t even watch it.

This movie was a complete fail. It gets 1/5 stars.

Have you watched SCOOB!? Let me know what you think in the comments.

If you like Game Of Thrones you’re sure to like A Death At Dawn.

A feudalistic world, embedded for centuries within the continent of Mystos is falling apart. Peasant uprisings, political and religious scheming from the academia, and the highborn’s lust for power are the causes for this political downfall in Mystos. A DEATH AT DAWN is the first book of an epic fantasy series that follows various characters, each going through their own journey during a time of civil turmoil. 

In the middle of the chaos is the ruling family of the Mountain Realm, House Wayward; a racially mixed family, dealing with their own inner conflicts.

However, when tragedy strikes House Wayward, instead of rallying together, the members split apart and strategize for their own advantage, even if that means taking each other down. 

This story gives the perspective of the people directly affected by these events. As some begin to experience adolescence, other older characters experience a taste of power, misery, deception, and insanity. Within the series, each character has to make decisions that not only affect their lives, but the lives around them, making many question if they are the true hero of this series. Book one sets up the journey that these characters will experience during the series.

(Description from Amazon)

My favorite thing about this book is how the history of each house tangles together into a picture of deceit and vengeance. You don’t know at first, but everyone is connected one way or another. This is hard to execute correctly, but Gabrielle Grey does a good job.

If you have read or watched Game Of Thrones you’ll notice striking similarities between some of the characters. The character Jaslyn reminds me of a cross between Arya Stark and Jon Snow. She’s the girl that refuses to be a lady and she’s a leader who never asked to be one. I loved Jaslyn as a character it was just so strange to read her and see other characters from other series’. If I had to pick a favorite it is definitely her, she’s a total badass and she was the most exciting character to read about. But, she would act out of character at points, like when she suddenly developed this crush on a young lord, at one point she notices the boy and this is how she reacts,

“Jaslyn touched the dirty sleeve of her blouse and realized that he would never notice her.”

To me it felt a little like we were throwing the badass girl who wears boys clothes instead of ladies clothes out the window, for a scared little girl with a crush. I might be being too harsh, Jaslyn is only 11.

The thing about multi-perspective books is that there will be characters that you love and characters that you hate. This can lead to some slow reading. I found myself wanting to stop in a few places because I didn’t want to read about a certain character. I think that the multi-perspective does do a really good job of moving the plot forward and creating a tangled history between the characters. One thing I would suggest is a family tree to go along with the book, just to help keep who’s who in check.

The author has done a good job at creating a world with a rich history and different magic system. This book, while much like Game Of Thrones, also has traits that make it unique. The world itself is interesting and has many moving parts. For me, it was hard to follow along at first, but I got the hang of it and actually enjoyed it. If you’re like me, hang in there through the beginning because you will figure it out and get used to it.

My biggest complaint is that this book is far too long for the content. There are points where it feels like characters are rambling or repeating the same thing for the third time. With the amount of time spent overly describing areas of land or characters emotions we could have been progressing the story. That is always the hardest thing to balance in fantasy, you always want to show not tell. The balance of being told what’s happening versus being shown what’s happening is off-kilter. There are scenes of characters being murdered and you only see it when their head shows up at someone’s bed chamber door. We should see them being killed instead of being told, it adds to the story of excitement. Anything like that I feel like we should see so that we are involved with the story.

I was also confused about a plot point where one of the ladies finds out her son is a bastard and not truly hers. But, how did she not know? Women have to birth their children, so was the baby switched at birth? And why? I feel like this is something that should have been answered immediately, but it’s waiting for the next installment. It would make sense if the father found out he was a bastard, but not the mother.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

With everything taken into consideration I’m going to give this book a 4/5 stars. I feel like it’s more of a 3.5 star book, but since Goodreads and Amazon don’t do half stars I’m bumping it up to 4.

Would you like a copy of your own? Follow this link to purchase a copy, and at no extra cost to you I’ll get a portion of the proceeds.

1. Don’t Just Summarize

If you’re writing a review you want to remember to actually review the books you read. If you get caught up summarizing what happened and never talk about what you thought, then you’ve written a summary and not a review. The point of a review is to have an opinion and ideas about the books content. You can talk about plot, tone, character development, anything you want, but make sure you have an opinion in there.

2. Be Clear

There really are three main ways to feel when approaching a review. You could like/love the book, hate/dislike it, or stand in a more neutral position. You have to remember to have firm opinions so that your readers can have a clear view of what YOU thought about the book. It seems almost pointless to write a review if you don’t have a firm grasp on what you thought of it. Reviewing is persuasive writing, so be persuasive.

3. Don’t Just Say You Like Or Dislike A Book

Why do you like or dislike a book? Make sure that you elaborate. Giving a star rating and saying yeah I liked it is not a review either. Your review should encompass the whole concept of the book to do it justice. How was the tone? Was the pacing too fast? Were the characters lacking depth? Let your readers know, because it helps them to make an informed decision about whether they’d like to read something.

4. Create An Intriguing Opening Line

Your very first sentence should capture the attention of the reader. Like a salesperson you want to say something right from the beginning to catch a readers eye. You can compare the book to another book/movie/TV show, or you can open with something about the book being innovative for its time. You want your opener to call out to something within your followers.

5. Be Unique

Stand out from the crowd. Do something you don’t see anyone else doing, or do it better. The easiest way to stand out is to be yourself and speak from your heart. I mean, you are one of a kind aren’t you?

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