July 2019 Recap

I was supposed to do this post yesterday but my son turned 5 months and we decided to take him to the beach for the first time, I mean look at that cute little face! Can you blame me for slacking off? Also he loves sand! Anyway, July was the first month where I was really productive. I did several reviews and if you missed them do not fret I will be covering them in this post!

To kick off my July posting I reviewed Teen Titans: Raven by Kami Garcia. I was impressed by Garcia’s adaptation of the Raven character and I think we can all look forward to what is to come next. I gave this graphic novel a 4/5 stars. Be sure to check out the new Raven and her powerful adopted family.

Next I reviewed The Hunger by Alma Katsu. Possibly the most impressive book I read this month, it was haunting and beautiful in a way that can’t be explained, you just have to read it. I gave The Hunger a whopping 5/5 stars! Also look forward to another review of a book by Alma Katsu I will be doing titled The Deep!

Next up was the popular NetGalley title Mooncakes by Suzanne Walker. While I understood peoples draw to this book and its popularity it did not do it for me. I felt like a debut graphic novel for a series should have been more impressive. It was a lot of rinse and repeat. But never-the-less I gave Mooncakes 3/5 stars because the illustrations were beautiful and it attempted to do things I hadn’t seen done before.

After that we talked about Small Spaces by the popular fantasy writer Katherine Arden. This middle grade novel really impressed me, it was spooky and meaningful. Small Spaces squeezed 4/5 stars bordering closely on 5. I have actually requested the next title in the series titled Dead Voices, fingers crossed that I am approved to read that one!

Kingdom Cold by Brittni Chenelle was up next. This love story had so many ups and downs I struggled to stop reading. With an ending that shook me to my core Kingdom Cold earned itself a 4/5 stars. This novel is sure to anger you and make you fall in love all at once, check this one out.

Last week I reviewed Crown Of Coral And Pearl by Mara Rutherford. You will absolutely regret it if you miss this one! Rutherford’s YA Fantasy is beautiful and entertaining beyond what I expected. Crown Of Coral And Pearl was the second book of July that earned itself a 5/5 stars. This book releases on August 27th, you must get your hands on it if you are a lover of YA.

Lastly we covered The Lure Of The Ring by Alan James Strachen and Janet Coster. An unusual pick on my part, this book explores addiction and unanswered question buried within Tolkien’s The Lord Of The Rings. While interesting it was a little wordy, if you are interested in a deeper understanding of Tolkien’s work it may be worth it to check this one out. This one earned a 3/5 stars.

A huge thank you to my followers for sticking with me and also joining me this month. Hopefully you are enjoying this as much as I am, and as always keep your eyes out for my next posts. I have some good stuff for the month of August!

The Hunger by Alma Katsu

One of the greatest elements in horror is making you question whether the greatest evil of all comes from within. In Katsu’s The Hunger we are posed with evil from all angles, external and internal. This novel does not make its monsters a secret, we get our fill of bloodthirsty creatures stalking the night, but what it does hide beneath the surface is the secrets and atrocities that the people next to you are capable of committing.

In The Hunger we get to see the Donner Party re imagined as they make their great western trek across America. While most people already know how this story ends, Katsu offers up a different explanation for the Donner’s cannibalistic demise by throwing monsters into the picture. But, this is not your typical hack and slash monster story, it has a depth that was unexpected and truly impressed me. I was left more curious about the evil that lies within human beings than anything.

We follow the party along their journey viewing the events through the lens of many different travelers. The most prominent being Charles Stanton, a lone traveler with a secret, Tamsen Donner the wife to the patriarch and leader George Donner, and James Reed a family man with a fatal flaw. The wagon train is going well until George Donner makes the irrational decision, influenced by the hack Lansford Hastings, to turn away from the Oregon trail and set course through the mostly untamed trail heading toward Weber Canyon with the expectation to take an easier trail through the Wasatch mountains. No such trail existed. Instead they faced hardship after hardship through the Great Salt Lake and meeting their eventual demise in Sierra Nevada Mountains. The unexpected twist is that the party is under near constant surveillance from creature lurking in the trees, the party starts questioning who or what the creatures are and as more of the pioneers disappear or go mad the panic begins.

I have a, probably, unhealthy fascination with the way gore is described in novels, and Katsu does this very well. Nauseatingly well. I have always had an admiration for people who can make my stomach turn just through description, Katsu truly did not let me down. Here’s an example that gave me the creeps, “The head was intact. In fact, if you only looked at the face you wouldn’t think anything was wrong. The boy’s eyes were closed, long brown eyelashes stark against chalk white cheeks. His fine blond hair was plastered against his skull, his tiny mouth closed. He looked peaceful, as though he were sleeping. But from the neck down…” This description is just so fitting of the novel altogether. At first glance it seems like it will be a normal story about pioneers, but underneath it festers with something evil. Another of Katsu’s abilities, is the ability to instill fear. One of her descriptions of the monsters sent a shiver down my spine, she wrote, “His fingers grazed the very end of the rifle stock. Slipped. But the thing had him now, had a mouth around his ankle- Stanton gasped in terror as he saw human eyes, a human nose…” Something about this imagery just paralyzed me. As much as I would like to include a few more sentences from that section I can’t because it would give too much away. Just trust me when I say that this book is freaky.

It is very clear that Katsu dedicated a lot of her time to researching the history for the Donner party so that she could perfectly execute an adjacent story line. She has a familiarity with the history that creates an intimacy between you and the party. It feels like you are peeping in on the hidden lives of the Donner party, non of her creative liberties feels disingenuous or implausible. It inspired me to read up on the historical background of the Donner Party and it is crazy for me to think about the sheer amount of research that she must have put in. A lot the history and people are accurate, it takes the term historical fiction to a new and impressive level. Katsu didn’t just take a moment in history and use it to loosely base a story on, she embedded herself in the history and based her fiction as closely on reality as possible.

I’m a sucker for horror, but I do not believe this made me biased towards this novel. This novel truly deserves any praise that is receives, and for me it is an easy 5/5 stars. I was entertained throughout and had such a hard time putting the book down. Horror novels have a tendency to speed up and slow down as suspense intensifies and wanes, but not The Hunger. The internal and external conflicts are so intense and well written that it is hard to lose interest for even a second.